What We Are Trying To Do

:

,

‘, .

As residents Kings Clipstone we are proud of the history of our community but very concerned that neglect is ruining our heritage and environment.

Our community led campaign aims to :-

make the wider community aware of the unique position that the village occupies within Sherwood and its important past.

Beeston Lodge - the pele tower

King John’s Palace – a far more important building than previously thought but in threatened by complete collapse.

This photo was taken in the 1950s showed the ruins of Beeston Lodge, which is thought to be the gatehouse of the original pele built above the Spar Ponds. Neglect and vandalism destroyed these last stahding walls leaving just a pile of stones on the ground.

The same fate awaits the remains of the Flood Dykes and the ruins of Kings John’s Palace if action isn’t taken now.

Cleaning up Intake Wood

Some of the residents of Kings Clipstone and Clipstone Village who turned out on Saturday 10th March 2007 to clear up Intake Wood. The wood, which is open to the public, has been taken over by Newark & Sherwood Council who plan with the help of the local community turn into a local nature reserve. This is a great facility right at the heart of our communities and much loved by local people. We had already put up bird and bat boxes sponsored by residents and decided it was time to do something about the fly tipping and litter from the building sites that has spoiled parts of the wood.

Cleaning up Intake Wood

It is great to see the way the community has turned out to support us. With well over 30 people helping we managed to do far more than we expected. We were even able to tackle the parish council land at the side of the wood. Newark and Sherwood Council provided a skip but we managed to gather enough to fill three skips. It just shows what can be done when the community comes together.

The Air Cadets were a great help.

A circular route of about 4.5 miles along Archway Road to Birklands, then via Sherwood Forest Farm Park and the Maun Valley before returning to the village along Squires Lane.

Starting at the Dog & Duck pub, follow Archway Road.

Alternative starting point – Sherwood Forest Farm Park(9) which has a car park and tearoom that groups can use by prior appointment – phone 823558. Open April to early October.


Route 1 KC

1. The signalbox is one of the finest examples left in the county. If you turn and look at the field you will see how uniform the slope is. Between 1819 and 1838 the Duke of Portland spent almost £40,000 on a 8 Mile irrigation scheme called the Flood Dykes to create water meadows on the dry and sandy land. Huge amounts of earth were moved to smooth the fields and move the river, with an irrigation canal being excavated along the top. The road now takes you under the railway. The smaller arch allowed the Flood Dyke to pass under the railway. At the junction ahead turn left under the railway bridge. All the fields on this side of the river were part of the irrigation scheme so show the same sort of uniform slope.

2. The bridge across the River Maun is called Forge Bridge and is believed to be the site of one of the iron forges and slitting mills found along the river around 1650. Forges need a good supply of charcoal and waterpower to work the hammers and bellows. In a 20 year period from 1640 the forest was plundered of most of the tress and fencing to make charcoal.

3. Archway Lodge was built by the Duke of Portland to prove the durability of the stone from his Mansfield Woodhouse quarries, after it had been rejected for the rebuilding of the Houses of Parliament following the fire of 1835. The outside of the building is a copy of the Worksop Prior gatehouse but instead of saints the niches are adorned with figures from forest folk-law. This was supposed to be the first of several lodges spanning a private drive form Welbeck to Nottingham but no more were built. The building was sited so that the centre tree 1.5 miles away along Green Ride could be seen through the arch but trees now block the view.

4. Follow the road up to the A6075 and cross. Take the track bearing left along the edge of the forest. This is the forest of Birkland, some sections have very old oaks. When you reach a path crossing the track, turn left.

5. Follow the path until you come to a cross on your left (on the forest edge) marking St Edwins chapel and hermitage.

6. Turn left at the next track, which will take you back towards the A6075, crossing into King’s Wood, follow the permissive path through the wood.

7. The path emerges opposite the entrance to the Sunday Market and the Farm Park. There are good views over ancient Clipstone Park – the royal hunting park was 7.5 miles in circumference.

The farm park, open from April to early October has a tearoom and car park that groups can used by prior arrangement 01623 823558.

8. Follow the road way down the hill past the Farm Park. Still going down hill you will pass through a gate with a sign stating that it is locked at dusk. There is a fine old wood to the right with Iron-age pigs roaming in an enclosure.

9. The road continues to drop into the valley, then turns right for a short way before turning left past the one of the fishing lakes. The walk crosses the river and ascends the hill. At the fork in the track bear left. With the beech wood on your right continue up the hill. On the top, cross over the next track and take the footpath through Cavendish wood. The farm yard is not a right of way. Emerging from the wood turn left along the track. Cavendish Lodge and farm are the next building you pass.

10. The old barn has two fine horse draw wagons in it. Follow the road round to the right. This is Squires Lane.

Please remember that the barn is private property, you may only look from the path.

11. At the bottom of the dip look left to the back of the field. The hedge is on an embankment that was the dam for the old fish pond. Half way down the lane are Old Barnside Cottages, parts of which may date to 1730 when Clipstone Hall stood on what is now Old Barn Court. At the end of Squires Lane the village proper begins. The walk joins Gorsethorpe Lane then turns left onto the B6030.

12. Across the road can be seen one of the few iron chapels left in the area. Behind the chapel are the ruins of Kings John’s Palace.

13. As you move across the embankment towards the Dog & Duck pub, to the right is the water meadow. From before 1180 for about 600 years this was the site of the half a mile long Great Pond of Clipstone. The remains of the dam are to the left of the road. The 1180 record also mentioned a mill situated at the bottom of the slope where Vicar Water joins the river Maun.

A circular route of about 8.5 miles along Bog Lane and Archway Road to Birklands, then via Sherwood Forest Farm Park and the Maun Valley before returning to Vicar Water past the Spa Ponds.

Route 12 VWCP

1. Starting by the visitors centre at Vicar Water Country Park take the left hand exit from the car park towards the lake.

Alternative starting point Sherwood Forest Farm Park(13) – car park and tearoom which groups can be use by prior arrangement – phone 01623 823558.
(Open April to early October only)

2. Skirting the lake continue going north on the national cycle route.

3. After Baulker Lane the route enters Kings Clipstone, the entrance on your left to Waterfield Farm marks the southern end of the Great Pond of Clipstone. The pond predates 1180 when it first appeared in records, when repairs were carried out. The pond stretched all the way to the road embankment you can see in front of you.

4. On the hill to your left are the remains of King John’s Palace which served as a home to all the Plantagenet kings.

5. Follow Bog Lane to the Dog & Duck -cross the B6030 take Archway Road.

6. The signal box is one of the finest examples left in the county. If you turn and look at the field you will see how uniform the slope is. Between 1819 and 1838 the Duke of Portland spent almost £40,000 on a 7.5 Mile irrigation scheme called the Flood Dykes to create water meadows on the dry and sandy land. Huge amounts of earth were moved to smooth the fields and move the river, with an irrigation canal being excavated along the top. The road now takes you under the railway. The smaller arch allowed the Flood Dyke to pass under the railway. At the junction ahead turn left under the railway bridge. All the fields on this side of the river were part of the irrigation scheme so show the same sort of uniform slope.

7. The bridge across the River Maun is called Forge Bridge and is believed to be the site of one of the iron forges and slitting mills found along the river around 1650. Forges needed a good supply of charcoal and waterpower to work the hammers and bellows. In a 20 year period from 1640 the forest was plundered of most of the tress and fencing to make charcoal.

8. Archway Lodge was built by the Duke of Portland to prove the durability of the stone from his Mansfield Woodhouse quarries after it had been rejected for the rebuilding of the Houses of Parliament following the fire of 1835. The outside of the building is a copy of the Worksop Prior gatehouse but instead of saints the niches are adorned with figures from forest folk-law. This was supposed to be the first of several lodges spanning a private drive from Welbeck to Nottingham but no more were built. The lodge is arranged so that the centre tree 1.5 miles away along Green Ride could be seen through the arch.

9. Follow the road up to the A6075 and cross. Take the track bearing left along the edge of the forest. This is the forest of Birkland. some sections have very old large oaks. When you reach a path crossing the track, turn left.

10. Follow the path along the edge of the forest (on the left) until you come to the cross marking St Edwins Chapel and Hermitage.

11. Turn left at the next track which will take you back towards the A6075, crossing into King’s Wood, follow the permissive path through the wood.

12. The path emerges opposite the entrance to the Sunday Market and the Farm Park. There are good views over ancient Clipstone Park – the royal hunting park was 7.5 miles in circumference.

13. Follow the roadway down the hill to the the Farm Park – they have a tearoom and car park that groups can use by prior arrangement phone 01623 823558. Still going down hill you will pass through a gate with a sign stating that it is locked at dusk. There is a fine old wood to the left with Iron-age pigs roaming in an enclosure.

14. By the bridge over the River Maun turn right and take the track between the river and the lakes. The lakes have been created as a result of subsidence. Following the track to the end of the fishing lakes where it turns right and goes up the hill.

15. At the top turn left along the old Flood Dyke. The Flood Dyke snaked along the hill carrying water & sewage from Mansfield. Sluices then allowed it to flood the water meadows on the slopes below. The irrigation system took 20 years to built and involved moving huge amounts of soil to produce the smooth slopes. The bogs in the valley bottom, 9 feet deep in places, were the most expensive problem to overcome. There were numerous springs as well which required land drains to be laid deep under the surface.

16. The path you are following is crossed by Packman’s Road, turn left down the hill. Buried underneath the concrete on the bridge is the old stone bridge.

17. At the river follow the path round to the Spa Ponds. The hill above the spar ponds is the site of Beeston Lodge (the pele gatehouse). Continue past the first pond, then turn left along the dam and right up the hill.

18. Follow the path up the hill, with the field on your left until you come to the playing field. At the top of the playing field turn right take the 2nd on to Newlands Drive (past the middle of the playing field).

19. At the B6030 roundabout you need to go left, cross the road and follow the track down – to continue in the same direction as Newlands Drive.

A partly circular route of about 5.5 miles along Squires Lane to the Spa ponds via the river and Flood Dykes, then along Clipstone Drive before returning to the village down Squires Lane.

Start on Squires Lane

maps/route2kc.jpg” alt=”Route 2 KC” height=”240″ width=”353″ />

The path follows the track with the single bar gate across.

10. The route back is an easy downhill walk along the almost straight lane until you get back to Cavendish Lodge.The ‘straight mile’ was the site of early car and motor bike trials. From 1914to 1920 the field to the right were the site of Clipstone Army camp.

A circular route of about 5 miles along Archway Road to Edwinstowe, Birklands and returning to the village down Green Ride and Archway Road.

Start on Archway Road

Route 5 KC

1. The route follows Archway Road north. The signal box is worth stopping to look at.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20081009152817/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20081009152817/http://www..org).

A circular route of about 8 miles along Archway Road to Edwintowe, then the Major Oak and Birklands, returning via Warsop Windmill, Sherwood Forest Farm Park, the Maun Valley and Squires Lane.

2. Follow the lane round past the signal box on Clipstone west junction. The box is one of the best examples left in the county. The second arch allowed the Flood Dyke to pass beneath the railway. Follow the lane round to the left under the second railway bridge. The lane then drops down to Forge Bridge and turn right down the river. – During mid 1600s Kings Clipstone was site of busy industrial mills – timber to produce charcoal and waterpower meant that Kings Clipstone had a number of slitting mills – pig iron was refined by removing the impurities(mainly carbon), then passed through rollers and a slitting mill to produce nails.

5. Cross the A 6075 at the traffic lights and continue on Church Street until you reach the cricket ground. Turn left and follow the path past the funfair to the back corner. It is signed bridleway to Glebethorpe. At the first branch in the track take the right hand track to the Major Oak.

8. Warsop Windmill – Kings Wood – it is claimed that the wood contains remains of a deer leap and ditch that enclosed Clipstone Park. The park which was enclosed in 1180 by a paling and ditch over 7 miles in length was a royal deer park. It still appeared on maps as late as 1801.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20081009030903/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20081009030903/http://www..org).

A circular route of about 7 miles starting at Vicar Water Country Park, then through Sherwood Pines (rightfully the centuries old name of called Clipstone Shrogges should be used). The route follows the B6030 to Kings Clipstone and finally returns along Bog Lane.

Start at Vicar Water Country Park

1. Leave the car-park by the left hand exit and head for the lake. Bear right at the lake and follow the national cycle route 6 signs down the back of the reclaimed pit tip. You should have the hill on the right and the old railway cutting on the left.

2. Stay on this path, it turns right and follows the electricity poles (don’t go across the first bridge). At the next junction in the path turn left – there is a national cycle route sculpture

3. Cross the old railway bridge and turn left again, you should see to the left the cutting with exposed sandstone and heather.

4. This takes you across another bridge – carry straight on.

5. Go through the bridge under the railway embankment. You are now in Sherwood Pines.

6. Keep going straight on, following the track uphill. The track levels out and runs very straight until it meets another track in a T junction.

7. Turn right – the track descends.

8. Then turn left at the next junction. The track passes through heathland and acid grassland typical of Clipstone Shrogges before the Forestry Commision took it over.

9. This track takes you towards Centre Parcs where a left turn takes you up hill.

10. To the right the edge of the forest can be seen. When a path crosses the track and the forest edge moves away, turn right and look for the very old parish boundary marker just inside the path on the right. The marker is inscribed with an S for the Savilles who owned the Rufford Estate which abutted the Portland Estate here. Rejoin the track and continue as before going up the gentle slope. Ignore side tracks and paths until you come to a tree trunk placed across the track.

11. Turn left and immediately right onto the tarmac road.

12. This takes you to the B6030 where a left down the hill takes you to Kings Clipstone. Be cautious on this section of the road, there is a wide verge but it is uneven in places.

13. Turn left at the Dog & Duck and go south along Bog Lane towards Vicar Water Country Park.

14. The path goes up the small valley of Vicar Water. The remains of the royal palace can be seen on the hill above. The large area of meadow is one of the few surviving parts of the Flood Dyke irrigation scheme which was over 8 miles long, from Mansfield to beyond Edwinstowe. The valley was the site the Great Pond of Clipstone before the irrigation work, at over half a mile long it first appeared in royal records in 1180.

15. Bear right when you reach Vicar Water Lake.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20081009152822/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20081009152822/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090515135026/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090515135026/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20100109105332/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20100109105332/http://www..org).

To access this part of the site, you need to log in with your user name and password.

Please log out or exit your browser when you’re done.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090516191924/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090516191924/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090202083741/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090202083741/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20091019131400/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20091019131400/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090516191929/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090516191929/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20110527210634/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20110527210634/http://www..org).

150 visitors came from near and far to learn about the important historical sites in the village. One couple had walked from Big Barn Lane in Mansfield, another from Sutton in Ashfield. Given a guided tour of the Palace ruins, Great Pond of Clipstone and water meadow sites by Mickie Bradley and Steve Parkhouse, our visitors proved very enthusiastic about our campaign to save these important parts of our heritage.

Not only did our visitors stay for the tour which took over an hour (we had planned on 50 minutes) but they then stayed to ask alot of important questions and examined the exhibition in detail as well as talking to our helpers about the proposals.

Nearly all had no previous knowledge of the sites or the village and were amazed to find the ruins of an important royal residence in the area, a complex of buidlings used by all the Plantagenet Kings. Typical comments were “Absolutely fascinating and extremely informative history that needs sharing and saving” and “excellent – walking in the Lionheart’s footsteps” – this from one couple who lived in Mansfield.

There were to many comments about how mush they had enjoyed the visit to record.

  • Must be conserved.
  • Heritage centre should be on the main road.
  • No idea so much history on my doorstep.
  • Absolutely fascinating & extremely informative history that needs sharing and saving.
  • Disabled visitors access needed.
  • General public will want close convenient parking.
  • Disabled parking needed.
  • On site visit much clearer to understand.
  • Shame to loose it.
  • Very interesting, we should not loose this site it is part of our heritage.
  • A great deal of heritage on our doorstep worth working to preserve & recover.
  • Would love to see an educational facility about the site created in the future.
  • What about disabled access?
  • Further investigation of the site would be very interesting – also tracking down of possible scattered artefacts.
  • Would love to see water dyke in place to see better.
  • I think to make a feature of the Dog & Duck meadow and a Great Pond would be a particularly great improvement for villagers and visitors alike.
  • Very informative. During the tour, we realised how under-rated the area is. We are sitting on one of the most valuable assets in the county of Nottinghamshire, and unless we take immediate action to preserve this environment, it will be lost to future generations.

Note – at the moment the sites are fields – the plans envisage a surfaced multiuser path connecting the national cycle route to the Palace then to the pavement at the top of the Rat Hole.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090517034832/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090517034832/http://www..org).

Enjoy a guided tour by experts of the very important sites within the village and finish with a visit to the pub and restaurant.
These sites are private property and is not normally open to the public.

Learn about

The village in 2005

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20080828092305/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20080828092305/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090515135324/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090515135324/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20110527210639/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20110527210639/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090213151736/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090213151736/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090515135124/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090515135124/http://www..org).

A circular route of about 6 miles from Vicar Water Country Park across to Clipstone Drive then along Squires Lane to Kings Clipstone before returning down Bog Lane to the Country Park.

1. Starting at Vicar Water Country Park, take the right hand exit from the car –park.

2. Continue in the same direction until you reach Newlands Farm. Here the path detours round the B&B . You turn right and follow the track straight up the shallow hill to the road.

3. Turn right to reach the road, cross it and resume your journey in the same direction.

4. You should now be on Newlands Drive. Ahead of you are the playing fields on Clipstone Drive.

5. Turn right onto Clipstone drive, this runs very slowly downhill. The lane was the site of early car and motorbike speed and braking trials, as it was a private road and a ‘straight mile‘. George Brough made a commemorative run in 1959 on Old Bill, his 100 m.p.h. machine from the 1920’s. George was a famous designer and manufacture of motorbikes in the 1920s & 30s. After one event in 1923 he had to spend several months in hospital, he was racing his famous SS in a standing start half mile at Clipstone when the front tyre burst he was doing 110m.p.h. He crossed the line in a cloud of dust and stones a few lengths behind his bike.

6. From 1914 to 1920 Clipstone Army Camp, which was home to 30,000 men, stood on the land to the left of the lane. It included all the land where Clipstone including the new housing estate. It had its own hospital and railway station.The village of New Clipstone was not built until the 1920’s.

7. The lane curves slightly at the bottom to skirt Cavendish Wood.

8. Clipstone Drive ends at Cavendish Lodge where the barn contains two old horse-drawn wagons. Turn right onto Squires Lane.

9. At the bottom of Squires Lane turn left onto Main Street (the B6030). The separate village history trail gives a guide to the village.

10. Turn right at the Dog & Duck and follow Bog Lane back towards Vicar Water Park. The meadow to the right was for over 600 years the Great Pond of Clipstone, It came almost as high as the road and stretched for half mile along the valley.

11. At the start of the fields the course of Vicar Water can be seen. The stream was forced into a canalised channel when the Flood Dykes were built between 1819 & 1838. At the back of the field is one of the few remaining parts of the Flood Dyke where the stream still flows in the original Flood Dyke.

12. The fields to the right of the path was part of the Great Pond of Clipstone as far as Waterfield Farm. The national cycle route passes through the farmland. It may not look it but the walk passes through a rich and varied habitat.

13. At the country park you need to end up bearing right but the lake makes a pleasant diversion and there are very good views from the top of the hill if you are feeling energetic, be warned it is steep. The shortest route up the hill is to go clockwise round the lake until you come to the path rising up the hill. Alternatively follow the route to site 1 where a track winds up the hill at a shallow gradient. Whichever way you got up the hill take the winding track down. The visitors centre which can be seen as you descend serves refreshments should you feel in need of recovery time.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20081009152827/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20081009152827/http://www..org).

The link address is: http://www.robinhood.co.uk/

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20070908160351/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20070908160351/http://www..org).

Route 3 VWCP

A circular route of about 7 miles from Vicar Water Country Park across to the Maun Valley, then to Kings Clipstone before returning to the Country Park along Bog Lane.

1. Facing the hill turn right and continue on the track until you reach Newlands Farm. Here the path detours round the B&B. Turn right and follow the track straight up the shallow hill to the main road.

2. Turn right to reach the road, cross it and resume your journey in the same direction. You should now be on Newlands Drive.

3. Ahead of you are the playing fields on Clipstone Drive. Head for the right hand back corner of the playing field and with the field on your right follow the path down the hill to the Spa Ponds.

4. Take one of the paths to the other side of the Spa ponds and turn right down the hill to Packmans Bridge. The Spar ponds are fed by one of the few remaining springs on the bunter sandstone, they are a Notts Wildlife Nature Reserve. The site of the pele and Bestwood Lodge (no remains visible now) is on the hill above.

5. Cross the bridge and ascend the hill turning right along the Flood Dyke path at the top. This path affords excellent views over the forest and valley.

6. At the next junction turn right down the hill. At the bottom the track turns left along the river and lakes.

7. Follow this track until the second bridge, then make a right turn and ascend the hill.

8. At the fork in the track.

Walkers keep left, the beech wood should be on your right. Where the next track joins take the footpath into Cavendish Wood. Under no circumstances go left as the farmyard is not a right of way.

Cyclists keep right with the beech wood on the left. Where the next track joins keep right, then take the next left when you have the field in front of you.

9. Both routes lead to Clipstone Drive where a left turn is made, this is part of the ‘straight mile’.

10. The track runs almost straight past Cavendish Lodge. Follow the road round to the right on to Squires Lane. As you go down the hill the ruins of palace can be seen just above the houses. About half way down the lane are Old Barn Cottages, these were probably converted from the barn and may contain parts that date back to 1730 when Clipstone Hall occupied the site next door.

11. At the bottom of Squires Lane continue straight on until you reach the B6030 – Main Street and turn left – see the village history trail.

12. Follow the B6030 through the village, at the Dog & Duck turn right and take Bog Lane towards Vicar Water Country Park. This is the site of the Great Pond of Clipstone and the water meadow. The remains of King John’s Palace (but really a palace used and added to by all the Plantagenet kings – Henry II, Richard I, John, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, Edward III & Richard II) can be seen on the hill to the right.

13. The next part of the track passes through some interesting forest edge habitat – this is an important piece of habitat for wildlife with the scrub grazing you can see, together with the scrub and heath decolonising the site of the railway sidings behind.

At the country park you need to bear right but the lake makes a pleasant diversion and there are very good views from the top of the hill if you are feeling energetic. The shortest route up the hill is to go clockwise round the lake to where you can see the path rising up the hill. Alternatively follow the route to site 1 were a track winds up the hill at a shallower gradient. Whichever way you got up the hill take the winding track down. The visitors centre which can be seen as you descend serves refreshments should you feel in need to recovery time.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20081009152832/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20081009152832/http://www..org).

This search form enables you to find content on the site by specifying one or more search terms.
Remember that you can use the quick search anytime, it’s normally good enough, this search form is just if you want to be more specific.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090516191939/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090516191939/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090516192002/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090516192002/http://www..org).

The procedure for claiming a new parish council is laid out in the 2007 Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act.

The first step is to decide the parish boundaries and name. For a village the size of Kings Clipstone a petition signed by at least 50% of the registered electors has to be presented to the District Council. This triggers a Parish Review. During this residents affected must be consulted along with and other councils. A decision must be reached within a year.

After widespread informal consultations with a large number of villagers a newsletter was delivered to evry home explaining what was happening and including an invitation to join a steering group.

The Steering Group members are

Connie Bottle, Martin Bradley, Connie Bottell, Bob Davies, Cate Hunt, Steve Parkhouse, John & Dianne Ross and John Severn.

These eight have been joined by Sarah Cooling.

Most people felt that Kings Clipstone was the best option for the name with the title of the new council being

Proposed Kings CLipstone Parish

The map shows the proposed new parishes. The Clipstone Parish contains all the urban area plus any land likely to be developed in the next 20 years. The Kings Clipstone Parish contains the rural area with the village and hamlets. Existing clearly visible boundaries such as the Bilsthorpe rail line and Clipstone Drive have been used to define its area.

Newark & Sherwood Council were asked to approve the map and motion on the petiton. With few house numbers the register of electors is inevitably fairly disorganised. To allow for this it was necessary to print the names and electoral numbers on the forms to enable the Council to check the petitioners against the electoral register. This caused some objections from a few residents who didn’t realise that the register was available for any genuine democratic purpose.

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090531220350/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090531220350/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20100109054518/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20100109054518/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090213152149/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090213152149/http://www..org).

great systems made by Zope Corporation (/web/20090202083816/http://zope.com) and they in turn – (/web/20090202083816/http://www..org).

Link list-

Maps

KingsClipstoneProject@hotmail.co.uk

Kings Clipstone Village

Website sponsors

Newsletters 2010 –

Skip to navigation

King John’s Palace

Skip to content.

Access Routes – walking, cycling, horseback

Newsletters

Advanced Search…

Skip to navigation

2007-10

Greenwood Community Forest

Skip to navigation

Navigation

Starting the campaign

Maps

Limiting the number of cars in the village – no new car-parks

Sherwood Forest Trust

Heart of Ancient Sherwood

2010-02

Map of places around the village

Skip to navigation

Kings Clipstone Village Action Plan

Project proposals – Updated March 2007

Kings Clipstone Project

Website sponsors

Why we need our own parish

Now & Then Village Trail

Intake Wood Cleanup – 10th March

Map of current paths + applications

Nottinghamshire County Council

Greenwood Community Forest

Log in

2010-07

Modern village

Archway Road-Brammers

Parliament Oak

News Archive

Sarah Jane Whitlam

Traffic 1

Starting the campaign

Traffic 5

Project proposals – Updated February 2009

Core principles

Skip to content.

Nottinghamshire County Council

Photos

Kings Clipstone Community Group

Navigation

Route 6 (7miles)

Sluice gate

Kings Clipstone Project

2008-06

Main Road traffic dangers

Skip to navigation

Kings Clipstone or Old Clipstone?

Places to stay, things to do

Skip to navigation

Skip to navigation

Signal Box

Iron Chapel 1935

Sherwood Forest walks & bike rides

Duck Pond

Route 5 (5 miles)

Events

Long Live Queen 1953

Skip to content.

Site Map

Bridleways B&B

Forestry Commission – Sherwood Pines

Home

Kings Clipstone’s key position

Road Safety Campaign

route 8(8.5miles)

Archway House

Kings Clipstone or Old Clipstone?

Iron Chapel 1910

Skip to navigation

Delib

King John’s Palace – the Kings Houses – a heritage priority

Skip to navigation

Intake Wood Cleanup – 10th March

Limiting the number of cars in the village – no new car-parks

Traffic 3

Pageant at the Palace 2011

Route 7 (7 miles)

Spa Ponds

Kings Clipstone Village Action Plan

Clipstone Shrogges

Kings Clipstone Project

Dog & Duck meadow

Nottinghamshire County Council

Sherwood Forest Trust

Robin Hood Living Legends web-site

Sherwood Forest’s heart – its history & geography

News Archive

Beat’s ploughing match

Website sponsors

2008-09

Skip to content.

Skip to content.

Beat both

Charles & Emma tinted

Skip to content.

March 2007

Kings Clipstone Village Council campaign

Read More…

Skip to content.

Skip to navigation

Home

Project proposals – Updated March 2007

Accessibility

Home

route 7 (8 miles)

Skip to navigation

Skip to content.

Pageant at the Palace

Photos

Log in

Kings Clipstone’s layout since the 17th century.

2007-01B

Photos

Skip to navigation

Bog Lane

Skip to navigation

Up one level

Contact

Traffic 4

Parish places

Navigation

Pictures

Village in 2000

Cavendish Drive speed trials

Friends of Kings Clipstone

84% sign petition

Skip to content.

About our partners

Access Routes – walking, cycling, horseback

February 2007

Skip to content.

Skip to content.

Skip to content.

January 2007 CV

Sherwood Forest Farm Park

The way forward

The Dog and Duck Meadow – a joint environmental and historical priority

Flood Dykes

Skip to content.

Home

Ashlar blocks

Skip to navigation

Skip to navigation

2010-10

Route 4 (6 miles)

Contact

Skip to content.

Skip to navigation

route 7 (8 miles)

route 1(4.5miles)

Why we need a Friends of Kings Clipstone

2009-10

2007-04

Open day – Easter Monday (9th April 2007)

Site Map

route 6 (7 miles)

2006-12

Newsletter

The Heart of Sherwood Forest – its history & geography

Skip to content.

Skip to content.

Main Road traffic dangers

2007-03

Why we need our own parish

Skip to content.

Skip to navigation

Skip to navigation

route 3 (7 miles)

Open day – Easter Monday (9th April 2007)

Traffic Accident

Habitat and landscape improvements – an environmental priority

Skip to navigation

Road Safety Campaign

Starting the campaign

Core principles

Newsletters

Iron Chapel

Old Photos

Places to stay, things to do

route 2(5.5miles)

Making the case

Contact

Carved stone 2

Skip to navigation

Print this page

route 1(4.5miles)

route 2(5.5miles)

The way forward

1945Flood dykesNowSmall.jpg

The way forward

Home

Skip to navigation

Skip to navigation

Sherwood Forest’s heart – its history & geography

Main Road

Route 2 (6 miles)

Croftside

Delib

George Brough1959

Kings Clipstone Village

Skip to navigation

Kings Clipstone Village Council campaign

Accessibility

Maun Cottage 1915

click here to retrieve it

Contact us

Clipstone Park

Kings Clipstone Village

Skip to content.

Skip to navigation

Forestry Commission – Sherwood Pines

Newsletters

Skip to navigation

St Edwin’s Cross

Archway School(pre 1908)

2007-08

King John’s Palace(2)

New Mill Lane

Flood Dykes

Events

Skip to content.

Skip to content.

Why we need a Friends of Kings Clipstone

Skip to content.

Current paths and applications

Aims of the Kings Clipstone Project

Membership Application

Brammer Farmhouse 1915

Skip to content.

2010-02special

Skip to content.

Bottom of the bank

Advanced Search…

Skip to navigation

Project proposals – Updated March 2007

Access Routes – walking, cycling, horseback

News Archive

Pageant at the Palace 2010

Sherwood Forest’s heart – its history & geography

The economic benefits – getting the best out of the changes

Traffic 2

Skip to navigation

Beat in costume

Core principles

Accessibility

Heart of Ancient Sherwood

Skip to navigation

Home

maun valley

Friends of Kings Clipstone

About our partners

Skip to content.

Traffic -ducks

Pictures

http://kingsclipstone.yuku.com/

Scott Wilson plc

Aims of the Kings Clipstone Project

Likely walls

The economic benefits – getting the best out of the changes

News Archive

Site Map

Finding your way round our village

Sherwood Forest walks & bike rides

The Heart of Sherwood Forest – its history & geography

Skip to content.

Carved stone 1

Habitat and landscape improvements – an environmental priority

Contact us

Skip to content.

Skip to content.

Skip to navigation

route 6 (7 miles)

Normal

John Allcock 1848-1918

Members

Skip to content.

Sherwood Forest walks & bike rides

Skip to navigation

Skip to navigation

Read More…

Skip to navigation

Skip to content.

Contact us

Beat & Bull

Log in

January 2007 KC

Events

Archway Cottages

The economic benefits – getting the best out of the changes

The 17th century

Greenwood Community Forest

Harry Sprigg

Heart of Ancient Sherwood

Rauceby c1915

Skip to content.

Route 3 (7 miles)

2010-03

The Kennels

History of Kings Clipstone

Route 8 (9 miles)

The Railway

Village 1635

Forestry Commission – Sherwood Pines

Route 1 (5 miles)

Bridleways B&B

Skip to content.

Skip to content.

Habitat and landscape improvements – an environmental priority

Finding your way round our village

Clipsotne Army Camp 1915-1919

Advanced Search…

Skip to content.

Community News Postings

2009-04B

About our partners

Beat 1

Friends of Kings Clipstone

About the Project

Modern village

Skip to navigation

Sherwood Forest Trust

Clipstone Pit and the model village

Village 1630

Skip to navigation

Long Live Queen tractor

Skip to navigation

Village 1900

Up one level

Skip to content.

Mozilla

Places to stay, things to do

Scott Wilson plc

route 5 (5 miles)

Geography of Kings Clipstone

Remains of the sluice

Old Photos

Gorsethorpe Lane

2009-09

route 8(8.5miles)

Limiting the number of cars in the village – no new car-parks

2010-04

Skip to content.

2010-05

Accessibility

Skip to content.

http://www.robinhood.co.uk/

Scott Wilson plc

Aims of the Kings Clipstone Project

Delib

Sherwood Forest’s heart – its history & geography

route 5 (5 miles)

2009-05

Project proposals

2010-08

route 4 (6 miles)

Skip to content.

2009-04A

Small

Delib

SteveP

Pictures

Home

About our partners

Contact

Sherwood Forest walks & bike rides

Whitey

King John’s Palace – the Kings Houses – a heritage priority

Events

Heart of Ancient Sherwood

Pageant at the Palace 2011

About our partners

Log in

Sherwood Forest Farm Park

King John’s Palace – the Kings Houses – a heritage priority

Pictures

Newsletters 2006-2009

At the heart of Sherwood Forest

Netscape Navigator

The Village

route 4 (6 miles)

Friends of Kings Clipstone

Newsletters

Successful campaign for Kings Clipstone Village Parish

W3C Accessibility Guidelines

Kings Clipstone Village Council campaign

Navigation

Clipstone Pit 1922

Skip to navigation

Skip to content.

SteveP

2007-01

Embankment

Places to stay, things to do

Clipstone Army Camp

April 2007

The Maun Valley Trails – ancient Clipstone Park

kingsclipstoneproject@hotmail.co.uk

Skip to content.

Castle Field

Advanced Search…

Site Map

Contact us

Flood Dykes

Open Evening 16th July 2007

Project proposals – Updated March 2007

Archway Lodge

route 3 (7 miles)

Brammer family portrait

Members

The Dog and Duck Meadow – a joint environmental and historical priority

Skip to navigation

Skip to navigation

Maun Valley Lakes

Skip to navigation

More detailed history of the main sites

Road Safety Campaign

Some of our activities

Weslyan Chapel

Home

The Dog and Duck Meadow – a joint environmental and historical priority

Opera

Why we need our own parish

Leave a Reply